The Treasury of David

The Treasury of David is one of several C.H. Spurgeon books that are in the public domain. If you propose to study the Psalms, I suggest you download this as a companion for your other references.

Psalm 28

Title And Subject. Again, the title “A Psalm of David,” is too general to give us any clue to the occasion on which it was written. Its position, as following the twenty-seventh, seems to have been designed, for it is a most suitable pendant and sequel to it. It is another of those “songs in the night” of which the pen of David was so prolific. The thorn at the breast of the nightingale was said by the old naturalists to make it sing: David’s griefs made him eloquent in holy psalmody. The main pleading of this Psalm is that the suppliant may not be confounded with the workers of iniquity for whom he expresses the utmost abhorrence; it may suit any slandered saint, who being misunderstood by men, and treated by them as an unworthy character, is anxious to stand aright before the bar of God. The Lord Jesus may be seen here pleading as the representative of his people.

Psalm 28:2

Exposition

This is much to the same effect as the first verse, only that it refers to future as well as present pleadings. Hear me! Hear me! Hear the voice of my supplications! This is the burden of both verses. We cannot be put off with a refusal when we are in the spirit of prayer; we labour, use importunity, and agonize in supplications until a hearing is granted us. The word “supplications, “in the plural, shows the number, continuance, and variety of a good man’s prayers, while the expression “hear the voice,” seems to hint that there is an inner meaning, or heart voice, about which spiritual men are far more concerned than for their outward and audible utterances. A silent prayer may have a louder voice than the cries of those priests who sought to awaken Baal with their shouts. When I lift up my hands toward thy holy oracle: which holy place was the type of our Lord Jesus; and if we would gain acceptance, we must turn ourselves evermore to the blood besprinkled mercy seat of his atonement. Uplifted hands have ever been a form of devout posture, and are intended to signify a reaching upward towards God, a readiness, an eagerness to receive the blessing sought after. We stretch out empty hands, for we are beggars; we lift them up, for we seek heavenly supplies; we lift them towards the mercy seat of Jesus, for there our expectation dwells. O that whenever we use devout gestures, we may possess contrite hearts, and so speed well with God.

Explanatory Notes and Quaint Sayings

I lift up my hands toward thy holy oracle. Called (‏דְּבִיר‎), debhir, because there hence God spake and gave answer. Toward this (a type of Christ, the Word essential), David lifteth up his hands, that it might be as a ladder, whereby his prayer might get up to heaven. John Trapp.

Hints to the Village Preacher

Ver. 1-2. Prayer.

  1. Its nature—a “cry.”
    1. The utterance of life,
    2. The expression of pain.
    3. The pleading of need.
    4. The voice of deep earnestness.
  2. Its object—”O Lord, my rock.” God as our Foundation, Refuge, and immutable Friend.
  3. Its aim—”Hear,” “Be not silent.” We expect an answer, a clear and manifest answer, a speedy answer, a suitable answer, an effectual answer.
  4. Its medium—”Towards thy holy oracle.” Our Lord Jesus, the true mercy seat, etc.

The Treasury of David.

Singing Psalms

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