Memory Verse

100 Verses you should Memorize

25. John 14:27

Peace I leave with you. My peace I give to you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Your heart must not be troubled or fearful. —John 14:27

This is one of the Bible’s greatest verses about inner peace, spoken by our Lord in His upper room discourse (John 13-17) on the night He was betrayed. As the disciples listened to Jesus speaking that night, they must have cringed at the second and third words of the verse: I leave. Throughout the upper room discourse, Jesus sought to prepare His disciples for His death, resurrection, and departure from earth. But as He went to the cross, to the grave, and into the skies, He was planning to leave one aspect of Himself behind: Peace I leave with you.

And it wasn’t just generic or generalized peace. It was His own internal realms of infinite peace: My peace I give to you. He wasn’t bestowing it to them in a temporary, inconsistent, or conditional way: I do not give to you as the world gives. He was giving them a legacy of peace that had the power forever to banish fear and trouble from their hearts: Your heart must not be troubled or fearful.

Notice that this verse falls naturally into four phrases. You can memorize it one small sentence at a time. Realize that Jesus was speaking these words to you and me just as clearly and immediately as they were spoken to the disciples two thousand years ago. Once you memorize this verse, you can close your eyes and listen to Jesus saying it to you at any time.

Peace I leave with you. My peace I give to you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Your heart must not be troubled or fearful.

Norma Patterson of Portland, Oregon, called me the other day and told me about her aged parents. When they were in their nineties—her father was ninety-three—she came by to take them shopping. Her dad was in apparent good health for his age and had recently bought a tiller to use in his garden. The couple had their devotions together each morning and on this particular morning, the old gentleman had pulled a card from the Promise Box that said: “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid” (John 14:27 NIV). They shared that with Norma, and then the old fellow went over to the easy chair to sit and wait for the shopping trip. He dozed off. When they tried to awaken him a few minutes later, he was in heaven. “How thankful we were,” Norma told me, “for that final Scripture verse that served as the closing benediction to my father’s earthly life.”

So precious indeed is peace that it was the one legacy left us by our departing Lord. —A. B. Simpson

100 Bible Verses Everyone Should Know by Heart.

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Memory Verse

100 Verses to Memorize

24. John 14:6

Jesus told him, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me.” —John 14:6

On board the missionary ship Duff one Sunday in December 1796, Captain James Wilson told his passengers, “I was the youngest of nineteen children. While I was still a lad, my father, a ship captain, took me to sea. I grew up amid influences of the worst kind. When the war with the American colonies broke out, I enlisted in the king’s service and fought in the bloody battle of Bunker Hill. Returning to England, I secured a berth on one of the vessels of the East India Company.”

While sailing toward India, Wilson said, his ship was captured, and he was thrown in jail. One night, learning he was to be sold into slavery, he jumped from the prison ramparts into an alligator-infested river. Wilson escaped the river only to be captured. He was stripped, bound, and marched five hundred miles. “How I survived that terrible march or the tortures of prison, I cannot explain,” he said.

At length, however, he was returned to England where, at age thirty-four, he met Pastor John Griffin. “In three hours of conversation, Griffin convinced me of the weakness of my belief in natural religion and planted in my mind certain truths which led to my conversion. The text he used with convincing effect was John 14:6.”

Wilson purchased a ship and became the first to transport missionaries to the South Pacific. In his preaching he repeatedly proclaimed John 14:6. It was also a verse he used to bolster his missionaries, saying: “Dwell much on John 14:6. Jesus is the only source of life abundant for discouraged Christians and the only source of eternal life and hope for a degraded race.”

This is a timeless verse to learn. We should dwell much on it.

Compare John 14:6 with Acts 4:12, which says, “Nor is there salvation in any other, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved” (NKJV). Jesus is the only highway leading us to God; He is truth personified; He is the source and giver of eternal life—the only way of salvation. Thomas à Kempis said, “Without the way, there is no going; without the truth, there is no knowing; without the life, there is no living.”

Memory Tip

Jesus’ discourse on “Let not your heart be troubled” was interrupted by Thomas, who asked in John 14:5, “Lord, we don’t know where You’re going. How can we know the way?” Try imagining the tone of voice Thomas used. Was it gentle and sincere or edgy and argumentative? As you picture and replay the scene in your mind, you’ll soon find you’ve memorized the entire passage—John 14:1-6.

Jesus is not one of many ways to approach God, nor is He the best of several ways. He is the only way.—A. W. Tozer

25. John 14:27

100 Bible Verses Everyone Should Know by Heart.

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Memory Verse

From 100 Verses

23. John 14:3

If I go away and prepare a place for you, I will come back and receive you to Myself, so that where I am you may be also. —John 14:3

When we were first married, my wife and I had a visit from a salesman who, wanting to sell us waterless cookware, offered to cook our supper one night. He pulled a pot from his suitcase, put in some carrots, and poured in a little water.

“I thought you said it was waterless,” I said.

He replied: “It is. You use less water. It isn’t water-free; it is water-less. Instead of boiling your vegetables in a quart of water and washing away the vitamins, you use just a few spoonfuls of water.”

I wish I could say Christians can live a worry-free life; but by all means we must at least live a worry-less life. It’s true that the Bible tells us not to worry or to let our hearts be troubled, but the fact that we’re told not to worry implies the existence of worry in the life of the Christian.

Certainly in the upper room the disciples had reason to worry. But in John 14:1-6, Jesus warned them not to remain in a worried state of mind. He was telling us all: Don’t succumb to a troubled heart. Don’t give in to panic. Don’t cave in to anxious care. We aren’t to let our hearts remain in a state of agitation, panic, terror, or of being upset.

I may not be able to avoid being frightened on occasion. I may be unable to avoid flashes of panic or aches of anxiety. Perhaps I can’t totally escape the temptation to worry. But I can avoid remaining in such a state or abiding in such a condition. In fact, it’s my obligation as a Christian to fight off the sin of anxiety just as I would resist the sin of drunkenness, profanity, lust, or idolatry.

This passage is incredibly helpful in fighting the sin of worry (which is unbelief), and it also helps us in times of grief. I often use it at funerals, using this simple outline:

Verse 3 is at the center of this text; and in memorizing it, notice how every phrase emphasizes a different aspect of our Lord’s promised return. He is going away for the express purpose of preparing a place for us; He will return, and where He is, we will always be.

Memory Tip

In our list of 100 verses, we’re including John 14:1, 2, 3, and 6. Why not go ahead and learn verses 4 and 5, too? It’s one of the Bible’s most reassuring paragraphs.

The belief of Christ’s second coming, of which He has given us the assurance, is an excellent preservative against trouble of heart.—Matthew Henry
100 Bible Verses Everyone Should Know by Heart.

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Memory Verse: John 14:1

21. John 14:1

Your heart must not be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in Me. —John 14:1

To feel the impact of John 14:1, you have to read the end of the previous chapter, remembering there were no chapter breaks originally. This is part of the upper room discourse (John 13-17), as Jesus meets the final time with His disciples prior to His crucifixion. At the end of chapter 13, Jesus distressed His disciples by abruptly telling them He was leaving. He was going away and wouldn’t be with them much longer.

“Lord,” Simon Peter said to Him, “where are You going?”

Jesus answered, “Where I am going you cannot follow Me now, but you will follow later.”

“Why can’t I follow You now? I will lay down my life for You!”

“Will you lay down your life for me?” said Jesus. “I assure you: A rooster will not crow until you have denied Me three times.”

There must have been a deathly pause in the conversation, but a moment later Jesus added: “Your heart must not be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in Me.”

It’s important to see this context because it shows us that the truths of John 14 work in the most troubling times of life. These words weren’t spoken in the green pastures of Galilee on a cloudless spring day. They were spoken in a sealed room in a hostile city during a crisis in the face of impending doom. That’s why we know it’s able to reassure us, too, in life’s deepest valleys, darkest days, and strangest twists and turns. We trust in God and in God’s Son!

Eric Betz tells the story that while he grew up believing in God, nothing in his life demonstrated it. He occasionally attended church, but it was a chore. He was preoccupied with his family and pals, his job, and his girlfriend. Then in his late twenties everything fell apart. His parents separated, his friends moved away, he lost his job, and he and his fiancée split up. “At that point in my life, I lost all hope,” said Eric. “I experienced many sleepless nights because of anxiety and depression. I was looking for inner peace.”

Then one August day Eric found a pocket-sized Gideon New Testament in his apartment. Opening it, he found a page that said Where to Find Help, When… His eye fell on the reference for John 14:1, and he quickly searched through the pages for that verse. He read the entire paragraph, and suddenly his depression and anxiety faded. “I confessed to the Lord that I was a sinner and needed a Savior and asked Jesus to come into my life.” He instantly discovered a gift of inner peace that matched the words of Jesus: Your heart must not be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in Me.

There is no trouble to which the heart of man is exposed that a belief in the doctrine of the Gospel is not calculated to purify and to alleviate. —Thomas Chalmers
100 Bible Verses Everyone Should Know by Heart.

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Daily Service: Love one another

Daily Service – Love one Another

LOVE

How do you suppose Jesus wanted to set us apart from other religions (Pagan, Jewish or some other kind)?

He said “this is how you shall be known as my disciples, that you love one another”

John 13:34-35 (AMP)
I give you a new commandment: that you should love one another. Just as I have loved you, so you too should love one another. By this shall all [men] know that you are My disciples, if you love one another [if you keep on showing love among yourselves].

Romans 13:8 (AMP)
Keep out of debt and owe no man anything, except to love one another; for he who loves his neighbor [who practices loving others] has fulfilled the Law [relating to one’s fellowmen, meeting all its requirements].

1 John 4:7-8 (AMP)
Beloved, let us love one another, for love is (springs) from God; and he who loves [his fellowmen] is begotten (born) of God and is coming [progressively] to know and understand God [to perceive and recognize and get a better and clearer knowledge of Him]. He who does not love has not become acquainted with God [does not and never did know Him], for God is love.

 

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Daily Bible Reading May 2, 2018

5/2/18 Daily Bible Reading: 1 Kings 18-20, John 20, Proverbs 2

1 Kings 18:21 (KJV)
And Elijah came unto all the people, and said, How long halt ye between two opinions? if the LORD be God, follow him: but if Baal, then follow him. And the people answered him not a word.

1 Kings 18:21 (NKJV)
And Elijah came to all the people, and said, “How long will you falter between two opinions? If the LORD is God, follow Him; but if Baal, follow him.” But the people answered him not a word.

1 Kings 20:28 (NKJV)
Then a man of God came and spoke to the king of Israel, and said, “Thus says the LORD: ‘Because the Syrians have said, “The LORD is God of the hills, but He is not God of the valleys,” therefore I will deliver all this great multitude into your hand, and you shall know that I am the LORD.

 John 20:1-2 (KJV)
The first day of the week cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulchre. Then she runneth, and cometh to Simon Peter, and to the other disciple, whom Jesus loved, and saith unto them, They have taken away the Lord out of the sepulchre, and we know not where they have laid him.

20:1-2. The first day of the week, Sunday, Mary of Magdala and other women (cf. we in v. 2) came to the tomb. “Mary of Magdala” is a translation of the same Greek words which elsewhere are rendered “Mary Magdalene” (Matt. 28:1; Mark 16:1, 9; Luke 24:10). Her devotion to Jesus, living and dead, was based on her gratitude for His delivering her from bondage to Satan. She had been an observer at the cross and now was the first person at the grave. This tomb had been closed with a large rock door (Mark 16:3-4) and had been sealed by the authority of the Roman governor Pontius Pilate (Matt. 27:65-66). The women were amazed to see an open and apparently empty tomb. They ran and told Peter and the beloved disciple (cf. John 19:26) that a terrible thing had occurred. They assumed that grave robbers had desecrated the tomb.

The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures by Dallas Seminary Faculty.